Doctoral degrees

The Cambridge Cancer Centre funds both clinical and non-clinical PhD students to undertake cross-disciplinary research projects within the Centre’s partner organisations.

Cambridge Cancer Centre Non-clinical PhD Studentships
Graduate students funded by a Cambridge Cancer Centre Non-clinical PhD Studentship will obtain their degrees from the University of Cambridge. They will undertake a full-time research project, funded for 3 years initially, with the opportunity to apply for a further year of funding to complete their studies. Their research project will be directed by a Principal Supervisor and they will also be appointed a Second Supervisor, who acts as a mentor. Examination for the PhD degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

In addition to their PhD project, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. All first year students are required to attend the ‘Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate and the lecturer gives their approval. Graduate students are also expected to participate in their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they should regularly present their ongoing work.

Further information about Cambridge Cancer Centre Studentships available for admission in October 2015.

Cambridge Cancer Centre Clinical Research Fellowships
The Cambridge Cancer Centre provides funding for Clinical Research Fellowships, which are part of an Integrated Academic Training Programme, as defined by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), which means the training is tailored to equip translational scientists with the skills and experience they need to progress in their combined research and clinical careers. Here is an overview of the Cambridge Cancer Centre Integrated Academic Training Programme.

Clinical Research Fellows conduct a 3 year full-time research project under the direct supervision of a Principal Supervisor and a Second Supervisor, who acts as a clinical mentor. On completion of their research project, the Clinical Research Fellow is examined for the PhD degree, which involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

In addition to their PhD project, Clinical Research Fellows are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. It is compulsory for all first year Clinical Research Fellows to attend the ‘Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is designed to provide a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Clinical Fellows may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, as advised by their Principal Supervisor and on the approval of the lecturer. Clinical Research Fellows are also expected to participate in their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they should regularly present their ongoing work.

Further information about Cambridge Cancer Centre Clinical Research Fellowships available for admission in October 2015.

Other Studentships
Cambridge University offers a wide range of doctoral degrees requiring 3 or 4 years of full-time research, followed by submission of a dissertation and oral examination. Studying in Cambridge provides students with the opportunity to conduct research across a wide range of disciplines, allowing them to combine physical, biological and clinical research.

The following PhD programmes particularly encourage students to study across different disciplines with an emphasis on translating academic research into clinical practice:

Chemical Biology and Molecular Medicine, Department of Chemistry

This is a 4 year highly-competitive PhD training programme for the brightest students who want to apply their chemical knowledge to advance the latest developments in drug discovery and production.

Mathematical Genomics and Medicine, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics  

A 4 year programme providing the opportunity to work at the interface between the mathematical and computational sciences, and genome-scale and translational medical research.

Translational Medicine and Therapeutics (TMAT), School of Clinical Medicine 

Stem Cell Biology, Wellcome Trust/MRC Stem Cell Institute 

4 year PhD programme, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research 

PhD in Oncology, Department of Oncology, School of Clinical Medicine 

BBSRC 4 year PhD programme in Biosciences