Professor David Neal

University position: Professor
Personal home page: http://science.cancerresearchuk.org/research/loc/cambridge/ccri/neald/

PubMed journal articles - click here

Professor David Neal is pleased to consider applications from prospective PhD students.

Research description

Group Leader in CRI with interest in androgen receptor signalling in prostate cancer. We are studying androgen regulated genes as mediators of cancer progression using a combination of techniques including genomics on human tissue (ChIP-seq and sequencing) and using in vivo models. These studies are now being extended to man using experimental medicine approaches in patients with high risk prostate cancer. I am also PI on a collaborative study of sequencing for human prostate cancer (with Ros Eeles, Colin Cooper and Mike Stratton) where we are carrying out NGS on 150 prostate cancers. Principal Investigator on large clinical trial of surgery, radiotherapy and monitoring in early prostate cancer (NHS R&D funded - £36M). Lead investigator on ProMPT (translational research programme in prostate cancer funded by NCRI [£2M]). Both are leading to generation of large and well-annotated bio-repositories.

Research Theme
Early detection and intervention
Personalised cancer medicine
Research Programme
Cancer imaging
Experimental cancer therapeutics
Population sciences and primary care
Research Cancer Type
Prostate cancer

Key publications

Sharma NL, Massie CE, .... and Neal DE. The androgen receptor induces a distinct transcriptional program in castration-resistant prostate cancer in man. Cancer Cell. 2013 Jan 14;23(1):35-47. Massie CE, ...... Neal DE, and Mills IG. The androgen receptor fuels prostate cancer by regulating central metabolism and biosynthesis. EMBO J. 2011 Jul 6;30(13):2719-33. Eeles RA, ...............Neal DE, and Easton DF. Multiple newly identified loci associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. Nat Genet. 2008 Mar;40(3):316-21.

The ProtecT Trialists (the largest ever randomised trial of surgery in early prostate cancer)